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Shade Gardening Some Tips from Hawaii.

Dated-11 Mar 2013 

Shade Gardening Some Tips from Hawaii.

If you’re a first time gardener, or you’ve inherited your garden along with your house, then you’ll probably not have noticed that your garden has a shaded area. Believe me it will have a shaded space somewhere, even if it is in the very corner of the yard. That’s why you’ll need to be doing shade gardening this year. Executed properly, your shade garden can take you through for a long time.

If you find the shade in your garden is due to a tree or trees, even if it is your neighbor’s tree, you’ll find that the soil will be dry and full of roots. Planting may be difficult and you may have to improve the soil slightly before anything will grow. Be careful when doing this as some trees, like Oak, are very particular, and can be extremely sensitive to changes in soil depth. Also, if you have to till the soil around the roots, you’ll again need to be very careful as root breakage may occur and the tree might be damaged in the long term. No one ever said shade gardening was going to be easy!

If you already have a small lake or pond in your garden, or even a little winding stream, your water gardening efforts just became that much easier. Unfortunately, for the vast majority of homeowners, such a bonus is just not on the cards, so you’ll have to build your water garden from scratch.

When choosing your plants, you’ll have to keep in mind the conditions that are likely to be prevalent within your shaded area. Low, dappled sunlight, to perhaps no sun at all or perhaps sun at only certain times of the day. Limited water in the soil due to an extensive root system, poor air circulation caused by low lying branches, or intrusive walls. These are only some of the conditions you’ll have to deal with when shade gardening.

Having passed through the more serious parts of shade gardening, we can now move on to the more fun parts. Namely designing, and laying out your garden, and buying your plants!

Since plants that thrive in the shade aren’t as vivid and bright as plants that grow in full sunlight, it’s best if you lean more towards flowers with pastel shades, as darker colors will only tend to blend into the background.

Foxgloves are a favorite, as are Daisy’s, and Begonias. Bluebells and Forget-me-nots are also some true blue favorites. If you plan your shade gardening carefully, you can have blooming flowers for almost the whole year.

Other plants to consider are groundcovers. Hosts, are traditionally a good groundcover plant, with its big leaves that tend to hug the ground. English ivy, Wintercreepers, and Ajuga are also very good for groundcover.

No matter what you decide upon, make sure that you enjoy shade gardening, and all the benefits it can bring to you, like the peace of mind and relaxation that you can get from the natural subdued colors offered by the shaded garden.


Shade Gardening Some Tips from Hawaii.

If you’re a first time gardener, or you’ve inherited your garden along with your house, then you’ll probably not have noticed that your garden has a shaded area. Believe me it will have a shaded space somewhere, even if it is in the very corner of the yard. That’s why you’ll need to be doing shade gardening this year. Executed properly, your shade garden can take you through for a long time.

If you find the shade in your garden is due to a tree or trees, even if it is your neighbor’s tree, you’ll find that the soil will be dry and full of roots. Planting may be difficult and you may have to improve the soil slightly before anything will grow. Be careful when doing this as some trees, like Oak, are very particular, and can be extremely sensitive to changes in soil depth. Also, if you have to till the soil around the roots, you’ll again need to be very careful as root breakage may occur and the tree might be damaged in the long term. No one ever said shade gardening was going to be easy!

If you already have a small lake or pond in your garden, or even a little winding stream, your water gardening efforts just became that much easier. Unfortunately, for the vast majority of homeowners, such a bonus is just not on the cards, so you’ll have to build your water garden from scratch.

When choosing your plants, you’ll have to keep in mind the conditions that are likely to be prevalent within your shaded area. Low, dappled sunlight, to perhaps no sun at all or perhaps sun at only certain times of the day. Limited water in the soil due to an extensive root system, poor air circulation caused by low lying branches, or intrusive walls. These are only some of the conditions you’ll have to deal with when shade gardening.

Having passed through the more serious parts of shade gardening, we can now move on to the more fun parts. Namely designing, and laying out your garden, and buying your plants!

Since plants that thrive in the shade aren’t as vivid and bright as plants that grow in full sunlight, it’s best if you lean more towards flowers with pastel shades, as darker colors will only tend to blend into the background.

Foxgloves are a favorite, as are Daisy’s, and Begonias. Bluebells and Forget-me-nots are also some true blue favorites. If you plan your shade gardening carefully, you can have blooming flowers for almost the whole year.

Other plants to consider are groundcovers. Hosts, are traditionally a good groundcover plant, with its big leaves that tend to hug the ground. English ivy, Wintercreepers, and Ajuga are also very good for groundcover.

No matter what you decide upon, make sure that you enjoy shade gardening, and all the benefits it can bring to you, like the peace of mind and relaxation that you can get from the natural subdued colors offered by the shaded garden.